Cyber Criminals Targeting Business Mobile Devices

Posted by on Mar 10, 2016 in News | 0 comments

Cyber Criminals Targeting Business Mobile Devices

Cyber criminals are targeting mobile devices in growing numbers – especially those associated with business accounts. To protect the sensitive data on your devices, it’s important to remain vigilant, even if your financial institution implements preventative measures on your behalf.

“Banks use sophisticated safeguards to protect customer information, and it’s important for consumers to take certain safety measures too,” says Doug Johnson, senior vice president of Payments and Cybersecurity Policy at the American Bankers Association (ABA). “Remember that your smartphone or tablet is like a little computer, and any device used to connect to the Internet needs to be protected.”

Johnson recommends the following 12 steps to ensure your data remain out of the hands of cyber criminals:

1. Use the passcode lock on your smartphone and other devices. This will make it more difficult for thieves to access your information if your device is lost or stolen.

2. Log out completely when you finish a mobile banking session.

3. Protect your phone from viruses and malicious software (malware) by installing mobile security software.

4. Use caution when downloading apps. Apps can contain malware, worms and viruses. Beware of apps that ask for unnecessary “permissions.”

5. Download the updates for your phone and mobile apps.

6. Avoid storing sensitive information, like passwords or a Social Security number, on your mobile device.

7. Tell your financial institution immediately if you change your phone number or lose your mobile device.

8. Be aware of “shoulder surfers.” The most basic form of information theft is observation. Be aware of your surroundings, especially when typing sensitive information.

9. Wipe your mobile device before you donate, sell or trade it using specialized software or using the manufacturer’s recommended technique. Some software allows you to wipe your device remotely if it is lost or stolen.

10. Beware of mobile phishing. Avoid opening links and attachments in emails and texts, especially from senders you don’t know. And be wary of ads (not from your security provider) claiming that your device is infected.

11. Watch out for public Wi-Fi. Public connections aren’t very secure, so don’t perform banking transactions on a public network. If you need to access your account, try disabling the Wi-Fi and switching to your mobile network.

12. Report any suspected fraud to your bank immediately.

Source: ABA

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