Posts Tagged "best practices for cyber security"

Top 5 Cyber Attack Risks for Your Business

Posted by on Jun 9, 2016 in News | 0 comments

Cyber attacks continue to grow, with cyber thieves in pursuit of personally identifiable data that can be sold on the black market. According to the 2015 Symantec Internet Security Threat report, the past year saw a 23% increase in the number of data breaches. Here are some of the top cyber risks and what they may mean for your business, regardless of size: Cyber Risk #1: Human Error: Lost and Stolen Laptops and Smartphones Cyber Risk #2: Hacker Cyber Risk #3: Spear Phishing: Social Engineering Targeted at Employees Cyber Risk #4: Extortion Cyber Risk #5: Hacktivism: Social and Political “Hactivists” That’s why we offer extensive information security breach coverage with a variety of limit options and price points. CyberFirst Essentials® — Small Business insurance offers coverage for a variety of cyber security breach claims and lawsuits. Some of the most common ways an information security breach can occur within a small business include: Online hacking and theft of confidential information such as credit cards or social security numbers, medical or healthcare information, etc. Accidental loss or sharing of personal information The loss or theft of paper records from an office location CyberFirst Essentials — Small Business insurance offers coverage for necessary expenses including breach notification, credit card monitoring services, costs to retain a public relations consultant, and more. Call us today for details or a free...

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Cyber Criminals Targeting Business Mobile Devices

Posted by on Mar 10, 2016 in News | 0 comments

Cyber criminals are targeting mobile devices in growing numbers – especially those associated with business accounts. To protect the sensitive data on your devices, it’s important to remain vigilant, even if your financial institution implements preventative measures on your behalf. “Banks use sophisticated safeguards to protect customer information, and it’s important for consumers to take certain safety measures too,” says Doug Johnson, senior vice president of Payments and Cybersecurity Policy at the American Bankers Association (ABA). “Remember that your smartphone or tablet is like a little computer, and any device used to connect to the Internet needs to be protected.” Johnson recommends the following 12 steps to ensure your data remain out of the hands of cyber criminals: 1. Use the passcode lock on your smartphone and other devices. This will make it more difficult for thieves to access your information if your device is lost or stolen. 2. Log out completely when you finish a mobile banking session. 3. Protect your phone from viruses and malicious software (malware) by installing mobile security software. 4. Use caution when downloading apps. Apps can contain malware, worms and viruses. Beware of apps that ask for unnecessary “permissions.” 5. Download the updates for your phone and mobile apps. 6. Avoid storing sensitive information, like passwords or a Social Security number, on your mobile device. 7. Tell your financial institution immediately if you change your phone number or lose your mobile device. 8. Be aware of “shoulder surfers.” The most basic form of information theft is observation. Be aware of your surroundings, especially when typing sensitive information. 9. Wipe your mobile device before you donate, sell or trade it using specialized software or using the manufacturer’s recommended technique. Some software allows you to wipe your device remotely if it is lost or stolen. 10. Beware of mobile phishing. Avoid opening links and attachments in emails and texts, especially from senders you don’t know. And be wary of ads (not from your security provider) claiming that your device is infected. 11. Watch out for public Wi-Fi. Public connections aren’t very secure, so don’t perform banking transactions on a public network. If you need to access your account, try disabling the Wi-Fi and switching to your mobile network. 12. Report any suspected fraud to your bank immediately....

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Don’t Be a Cyber Slacker

Posted by on Oct 8, 2015 in News | 0 comments

There’s no question about it: those who fail to protect themselves online are vulnerable to identity theft. Are you a cyber slacker? If you’re a millennial, you might be. According to a recent TransUnion survey, most millennials are not taking action to safeguard their personal information online, despite being the most concerned about cyber crime. In fact, almost 90 percent of millennials store bank account information on their phones, and about 85 percent check financial accounts while connected to public Wi-Fi – actions that put them at risk of identity theft. In contrast, only a third of baby boomers report being concerned about identity theft, but at least half take basic precautions to protect themselves. Just half of boomer respondents said they store important information on mobile devices and just over half check financial accounts while connected to public Wi-Fi. “Cybercriminals don’t care about your age; they just want access to your identity and credit,” says Ken Chaplin, senior vice president at TransUnion. “It is important for people of all ages to be aware of the behaviors that make them vulnerable to identity theft and to not sacrifice security for convenience.” TransUnion advises all Internet users, millennial or otherwise, to heed the following best practices for cyber security. • Activate password protection on your phone. Cyber criminals can install applications on stolen phones that give them access to the device’s personal information, like photos, personal calls and banking applications. Set a unique password on your phone to create a barrier that makes it difficult for anyone to access the information. • Approach near field communication (NFC) applications with caution. Criminals have traded spam and antivirus hacking methods in favor of third-party applications. NFC applications, which allow data to be transferred between two local devices, such as through tap-to-pay methods at checkouts, and other third-party payment applications should be approached with caution. • Avoid accessing sensitive information on public Wi-Fi networks. Businesses that offer public Wi-Fi are required to share a liability notice, but many may not read it. By using Wi-Fi sniffing, when criminals intercept information while it travels from the access point to the device, your personal data can be at risk....

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