Posts Tagged "data breach protection"

So You had a Data Breach – Now What?

Posted by on Jul 9, 2015 in News | 0 comments

When larger organizations face a data breach of their customer or employee information, they often offer free credit monitoring services to affected individuals. If you are faced with a personal data compromise and don’t receive this offer, there are still several options to help you recover from a personally identifiable information (PII) breach, say the experts at Wombat Security Technologies. It’s important to be proactive about minimizing the impact of data breach, whether yours is one of many compromised records or you are the victim of a limited-scope breach. With the latter, if you have the motive and the means to enroll in a credit monitoring service on your own dime, it could be well worth the peace of mind to know that someone is looking out for you. Regardless, the following do-it-yourself activities will help you mitigate some of the damage caused by a data breach — as well as prevent future damage. If you’ve been alerted to an account breach — or you suspect you’ve fallen for a phishing email that prompted you to reveal credentials for a login-protected site like webmail, online banking, or social media — change your password posthaste. If you happen to use that same password on other sites, be sure to update those logins as well. Hackers will often cross-check stolen passwords on multiple sites in hopes of getting a hit. For cases in which you personally discover or suspect a data security breach, contact the help lines for affected accounts right away. Be sure to use trusted customer service channels, such as phone numbers from your credit cards or billing statements. In many cases, it’s not just account numbers that hackers and scammers scoop up. They often grab names, email addresses, and phone numbers to use in follow-up attacks. In these attacks, fraudsters will put together multiple pieces of information they have about individuals to make their messages and calls seem more legitimate and more believable. It’s important to be on high alert once you know your data is already in the hands of hackers. With all the ado about cyber security attacks, it can be easy to become complacent about snail mail. But consider the prior point about email addresses and phone numbers and you’ll see that the leap to a mail-based attack isn’t hard to make. If scammers obtain your name, address, and other identifying information, it can be easy for them to send compelling and seemingly genuine letters, bills, payment notices and other mailers. It’s critical that you verify the validity of unsolicited mail that asks for any type of remittance....

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Everyone At Risk with Today’s Data Breaches

Posted by on Jan 22, 2015 in News | 0 comments

Amidst a digital age and the digitization of information, identity theft is the fastest growing crime in America. Recent studies show that every minute, 19 identities are stolen. Headlines have shown data breach after data breach taking place at major retailers. And as seen in the case of Sony Pictures, no matter how large the corporation is, or how much security is applied to personal information, with today’s data breaches, everyone is at risk. To help prevent theft from occurring, the American Consumer Credit Counseling organization advises taking these preemptive steps. 1. Be elusive on social media. Try to exclude specific, important information from your social media profiles. Minimize details in your “About Me” sections, and leave out phone numbers or addresses. This information is prime knowledge for hackers. Also, be sure to set all your privacy settings to create a secure profile. 2. Strengthen your online passwords. While it’s easier to remember passwords with our birthdays or hometowns in them, try to make your password a little more complex. Use punctuation and different capitalization. Also, veer away from using one password for all your accounts; if one is hacked, all your information across accounts can be compromised. 3. Be wary with your email address. While shopping online, or creating required accounts, use a new email address. Creating an email address for yourself is an easy task, and it’s best to have a specific one for online activity. Use a primary email address for personal information; use your secondary one for shopping, newsgroups, or social networking sites. Make sure to only give your primary email address to people you know. 4. Look for signs. Look for suspicious red flags when you’re on websites or signing up for mailing lists. Make sure your online purchases come from companies with secure payment pages and privacy policies. You can check Web addresses: if there is an ‘s’ located after the ‘http’ (https://), the website is secure. If not, don’t use it. Never respond to emails asking for account information or passwords. If a “bank” is asking for this information electronically, make sure to call the bank directly. 5. Monitor what you’ve shared. Identity thieves gain access to personal information by piecing together information over multiple websites. Make sure to think about what information you have where online....

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Data Breaches and Identity Theft – What You Need to Know to Protect Your Business

Posted by on Oct 28, 2014 in News | 0 comments

Identity theft is a fast-growing problem, with multiple, large companies being victimized by major data breaches in the past year – and the pace is accelerating. More than 200 million data records were stolen in just the first quarter of 2014, according to research by SafeNet. One in three people who are victims of data breaches will quickly become victims of fraud, found Javelin Strategy and Research. “Data breaches continue to be a pervasive problem in the digital age, and we expect that trend to continue,” said Scott Mitic, Senior Vice President at Equifax. “Our tendency to share personal information online leaves that information vulnerable to hackers and identity thieves.” Whether viewing this information via computer, tablet or smartphone, your use of modern-day technologies increases your risk for identity theft. Equifax advises consumers to protect themselves by following these tips. Make sure your security software is updated on both your computer and smartphone. Free solutions are available from reputable sources. Keep your phone locked with an access code. Turn off Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. Download the latest software updates for your device to fix security holes. Be on the lookout for email scams. Keep your social media accounts private and don’t share common identifying information like your mother’s maiden name or your birth date. Use unique and complex passwords. After a data breach, change your passwords, place a fraud alert with the credit reporting agencies, close affected accounts and monitor your credit report. “As we go about our daily lives, it can be easy to forget how the technology we use every day can makes us the target of identity thieves,” said Mitic. “But by arming yourself with knowledge and the right techniques, you can help protect your personal information.” Source: Equifax...

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